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Source: Bosworth/Toller, page b0951, entry 7
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sweostor, swistor, swystor, swustor (-er, -ur); indecl. in sing.; pl. sweostor, sweostra, sweostru (u, y); f. A sister. I. of blood relationship:--Saga ðæt ðú sié sweostor mín, líces mge, Cd. Th. 110, 3, Gen. 1832. Ðære swustur (suoester. Lind.: swester, Rush.) wæs Maria huic erat soror nomine Maria, Lk. Skt. 10, 39. Soester, Lind. 10, 40. Swuster, Gen. 12, 13. Seó yldre swyster, 19, 33. Sweostor bearna nepotum, Wrt. Voc. ii. 59, 70. Se wæs his sweostor sunu, Bd. 4, 16; S. 584, 16. Sweoster sunu, 2, 3; S. 504, 20. Swuster sunu, Byrht. Th. 135, 8; By. 115. Ðæt ðú gesecge sweostor mínre, Exon. Th. 172, 32; Gú. 1152. Óþer him sylfum, óþer his sweoster, Bd. 4, 6; S. 574, 13: Homl. Th. ii. 546, 35. Gif geméteþ óðerne æt his swister, L. Alf. pol. 42; Th. i. 90, 28. bethte his swyster, Chr. 1048; Erl. 180, 23. hyre gingran swuster, Gen. 19, 31. Forlét Pendan sweoster, Bd. 3, 7; S. 529, 29. Swustor (suoester, Lind.: swester, Rush.) sororem, Jn. Skt. 11, 5. Swuster, Gen. 25, 20. Hiera swostur (sweostor, swystor (-er), swustra) wrun Cuénburg and Cúþburh, Chr. 718; Th. pp. 70, 71. Neogone wran Noðþæs sweoster, Lchdm. iii. 62, 18. Ealle his swustra (suoester, Lind.: swæster, Rush.), Mt. Kmbl. 13, 56. Swustra (suoestro, Lind.: swester, Rush.), Mk. Skt. 6, 3. Swestro, Jn. Skt. Rush. 11, 3. Ic seah vi. gebróþor and hyra sweostor mid, Exon. Th. 394, 13; Rä. 14, 2. Ðe ne onfó swustru (swustra, MS. A.: suoestro, Lind.: swester, Rush.) Mk. Skt. 10, 30. II. of membership in a religious house:?-Ætýwde sumre gódre swuster wundorlíc gesyhþ . . . Ðeós sweoster. . . , Bd. 4, 9; S. 576, 18-30. Seó gesomnung bróþra and sweostra, 4, 19; S. 589, 9. Ðá ongan heó on gesomnunge ðare sweostra sécan . . . Heó nnige andsware findan mihte, ðeáh ðe heó georne sóhte æt ðám swustrum, 4, 7; S. 574, 35, 40. Ðá geseah heó óþre sweoster (sorores) ymb restende . . . ðá áwæhte heó ealle ða sweostera, 4, 23; S. 596, 5-14. [Goth. swistar: O. Sax. swestar: O. Frs. swester, suster: O. H. Ger. swestar: Icel. systir.] v. ge-sweostor; ge-sweosternu.


Source: Torp, page b0544, entry 4
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svester f. Schwester. g. svistar f. Schwester; an. systir (run. swestar) pl. systr; as. swestar, afries. swester, ags. sweostor, suster (engl. sister); ahd. mhd. swester, nhd. Schwester. Davon (eig. vom. ersten Teile des Wortes) abgeleitet: as. swiri Sohn der Mutterschwester, ags. geswiria Schwestersohn, Vetter (auch -swigria zu svehra); aschwed. sviri Sohn der Mutterschwester. Ig. svesr (-r). Vgl. lit. ses g. seses, preuß. swestro; asl. sestra. - lat. soror. - ir. siur, fiur g. sethar, fethar. - arm. koyr. - skr. svásar, zend. qahar f. Schwester. - gr. [e)or quga'thr, a)neyio's] Hes., [e)'ores prosh'kontes, suggenei=s] Hes.

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       •sv (PGmc) is the parent entry of svester in Torp's hierarchy.

Cultural category
       • Semantic category: Family

Source: Wright's Gothic Grammar, page b0346, entry 22
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swistar, f. sister, 29, 66, 93, 147, 149, 216. OE. sweostor, OHG. swestar.


Source: Bosworth/Toller, page b0335, entry 18
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freónd-lufu, e; f. Friendly love, friendship, love, intimacy; amctia, crtas, familirtas :-- Saga ðæt ðú síe sweostor mín, ðonne ðé leódweras fricgen, hwæt síe freóndlufu uncer twega say that thou art my sister, when the men of the country ask thee what may be the intimacy of us two, Cd. 89; Th. 110, 7; Gen. 1834.


Source: Bosworth/Toller, page b0438, entry 33
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ge-secgan, -sæcgan, -secgean; to -secganne, -secgenne; p. -sægde, -sde, pl. -sægdon, -sdon; impert. -sege; pp. -sægd, -sd To say, tell, relate, declare, prove; dicere, narrare, indicere :-- Mec Dryhten héht gesecgan the Lord commanded me to say, Exon. 42 b; Th. 144, 10; Gú. 676: 102 b; Th. 387, 29; Rä. 5, 12. Nelle ic ðé gesecgan I will not tell thee, Exon. 88 b; Th. 333, 11; Gn. Ex. 2: Elen. Kmbl. 1966: El. 985. Ic ðé sceal Meotudes mægenspéd I shall relate to thee the Creator's power, Exon. 92 b; Th. 348, 7; Sch. 24. Him sceolde se yldra eall gesæcgan narrabunt eam filiis suis, Ps. Th. 77, 8. Ic wille míne leahterfulle þeáwas gesecgean I will confess my wicked ways; vitiosos mores corrigere, Bd. 3, 13; S. 538, 32. To gesecganne to say, Exon. 109 b; Th. 419, 1; Rä. 37, 13: Cd. 202; Th. 250, 9; Dan. 544. To gesecgenne to say, Cd. 163; Th. 205,17; Exod. 437. Gif he hit gesegþ if he saith it, Exon. 27 a; Th. 80, 22; Cri. 1310. Andreas Þeódne þanc gesægde Andrew said thanks to his Lord, Andr. Kmbl. 768; An. 384: Beo. Th. 4321; B. 2157. He gesde swefen cyninge he said the dream to the king, Cd. 180; Th. 226, 2; Dan. 165: B. 4, 18; S. 587, 2. Ðá gesægdon Rómáne Bryttum then the Romans said to the Britons, Bd. 1, 12; S. 481, 3. Gesege me dicito mihi, Bd. 2, 12; S. 514, 1. Ðæt ðú gesecge sweostor mínre that thou mayest say to my sister, Exon. 50 a; Th. 172, 31; Gú. 1152: Bd. 4, 3; S. 568, 27. Wæs gesd hwám ðæt sweord geworht wre it was said for whom that sword was wrought, Beo. Th. 3396; B. 1696. Ic sceall ealle forltan ða ðe of Perseo and of Cathma gesde syndon I must pass over all things that are said of Perseus and Cadmus, Ors. 1, 8; Bos. 31, 33. 34. Ðæt is gesd that is proved, Bt. 34, 9; Fox 146, 25, 27. DER. secgan.


Source: Bosworth/Toller, page b0448, entry 28
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ge-sweostor, -sweostra, -sweostro, -swustra, -swystra sisters; sorores; used as the pl. of sweostor :-- His twá dóhtor, swáse gesweostor his two daughters, own sisters, Exon. 112 b; Th. 431, 29; Rä. 47, 3. Ðr wron twá cwéna ða wran gesweostoa there were two queens who were sisters, Ors. 1, 10; Bos. 33, 36. Hwæðer mótan twegen we gebróðro twá gesweostro on gesinscipe onfón si debeant duo germani fratres singulas sorores accipere, Bd. 1, 27; S. 490, 28. Ðara eádigra ge-sweostra gemynd the commemoration of the blessed sisters, Shrn. 69, 18. [O. Sax. gi-swester: O. H. Ger. gi-suester.] DER. will-gesweostor. v. sweostor.


Source: Bosworth/Toller, page b0455, entry 28
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ge-þingian; p. ode; pp. od, ad. I. [ge-þing, II.] to make terms with a person for one's self or for another, to be reconciled, to come to an agreement, to reconcile, settle a dispute, intercede, mediate :-- Swá hie geþingian mgen wið cyning and his geréfan according to the terms they can make with the king and his reeve, L. In. 73; Th. i. 148, 11: 62; Th. i. 142, 3: Cod. Dipl. ii. 58, 26. Ðá geþingadun wið ðm wyrhtum conventione facta cum operariis, Mt. Kmbl. Rush. 20, 2: Chr. 694; Erl. 42, 15: 628; Erl. 24, 4. Ðr genam Hettulf Honoriuses sweostor and siððon wið hine geþingode there Ataulf took the sister of Honorius and afterwards made an agreement with him, Ors. 6, 38; Bos. 133, 15. Bútan ðú r wið geþingige unless thou first be reconciled to them, Exon. 68 b; Th. 254, 16; Jul. 198. Geþinge wið ðínum bróðer reconciliare fratri tuo, Mt. Kmbl. Rush. 5, 24. Swá beóþ þeóda geþwre ðonne geþingad habbaþ so are peoples in concord when they have made a treaty, Exon. 89 b; Th. 336, 29; Gn. Ex. 57. Goda bæd ðæt se kynincg him geþingude wið Eádgife his bóca edgift Goda asked that the king would arrange for him with Eadgifu the restoration of his charters, Th. Ch. 202, 32. He geþingade fhþa mæste he settled the greatest feud, Exon. 16 b; Th. 39, 2; Cri. 616: Blickl. Homl. 9, 6. ðé geþingodre none the more settled, L. In. 22; Th. i. 116, 12, MS. B. Gehwilces manes, dda hine gewrégaþ oððe geþingiaþ every man's deeds accuse him or reconcile him [to God], Boutr. Scrd. 20, 38. Ðæt me seó hálge wið ðone hýhstan cyning geþingige that the holy one intercede for me to the most high king, Exon. 76 a; Th. 285, 20; Jul. 717. Giþingage intercedat, Rtl. 66, 13: intervenire, 60, 42. Ðæt to ðam mildheortan Hlende hire geþingodon that they would intercede for her to the merciful Saviour, Homl. Th. ii. 112, 22: 528, 14: Past. 10, 2; Swt. 63, 2, 10: Hat. MS. Geþinga us intercede for us, Exon. 12 b; Th. 21, 29; Cri. 342. II. to determine :-- Hafaþ geþingod to us þeóden mra the great prince hath determined [to come] to us, Cd. 226 ; Th. 302, 12; Sat. 598. [Cf. ge-þingan.]


Source: Bosworth/Toller, page b0613, entry 2
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LTAN, p. lét, leórt; pp. lten. The ellipsis of a verb in the infinitive, the meaning of which may be inferred from the context, not unfrequently takes place after ltan; and the connection of many of the meanings which follow with the simple one seems explainable in this way. I. to LET, allow, permit, suffer :-- God lt him fyrst ðæt his mándda geswíce God allows him time that he may cease from his crimes, Homl. Th. i. 268, 32. Ðonne ne lteþ ús costian ofer gemet then he will not let us be tempted beyond measure, Blickl. Homl. 13, 8. Gif Drihten ðé lteþ ðone teóþan dl ánne habban if the Lord lets thee have only the tenth part, 51, 3. God lét habban ágenne cyre, Homl. Th. i. 10, 19. Ne leórt nigne monno fylgenne hine non admisit quemquam sequi se, Mk. Skt. Lind. 5, 37. Ðá onlýsde hine and lét hine féran æfter ðam biscope absolvit eum, et post Theodorum ire permisit, Bd. 4, 1; S. 565, 3. Se déma lét ða módor ðam suna on synderlícre clýsingce the judge allowed the mother to come to the son in a chamber apart, Homl. Skt. 4, 342. Se éca Drihten hine sylfne lét ldon on ða heán dúne the Lord eternal allowed himself to be led on to the high mountain, Blickl. Homl. 33, 10. Drihten ealle ða gefylde ða ðe hié on eorþan léton hingrian and þyrstan for his naman the Lord had filled all those who let themselves, or were content to, hunger and thirst for his name's sake [cf. in Icel. láta with a reflex. infin.], 159, 17. Lt beón ealne dæg let it be all day, L. M. 2, 22; Lchdm. ii. 206, 25. Ltaþ gðer weaxan sinite utraque crescere, Mt. Kmbl. 13, 30. Léte pateretur, Wrt. Voc. ii. 67, 4. lifde búton synnum ðeáh ðe hine léte costian, Blickl. Homl. 33, 17. Ltan nánne lybban to let none live, Ex. 14, 5. Se ðe mýn blód nolde ltan ágeótan he that would not suffer my blood to be shed, Nicod. 20; Thw. 10, 17. Léton, Exon. 46 b; Th. 152, 3; Gú. 921. Gif ðú ðé wilt dón manegra beteran ðonne scealt ðú ðé ltan ánes wyrsan if thou wilt make thyself the superior of many, thou must allow thyself to be the inferior of one, Bt. 32, 1; Fox 114, 14. II. to let [alone], let go, give up, dismiss, leave, forsake, let [blood] :-- Ne recce ic hwæt déman. Ic lte ðínum dóme ðonne hiora I care not what judgements they make. I give myself up, or trust, to your judgement more than to theirs, Bt. 38, 5; Fox 206, 14. Hwý nelt ðú géman ðæt mín sweostor lt áne þegnian why dost thou not heed that my sister leaves me to serve alone? Blickl. Homl. 67, 31. lt his hláfordes gebod giémeliéste he leaves to neglect [neglects] his lord's command, Past. 17, 8; Swt. 121, 14. Ltt ðonne án ðæt gefeoht sume hwíle he lets the battle alone then for some time, 33, 7; Swt. 227, 10. cwæþ him ltaþ ðæt nett on ða swíðran healfe ðæs réwettes ... hig léton dixit eis mittite in dexteram nauigii rete ... miserunt, Jn. Skt. 21, 6. Ðæt ic sylf ongeat ne lét ic ðæt unwriten what I myself knew, I did not leave unwritten, Bd. pref; S. 472, 26. God hine lét frigne God left him free, Homl. Th. i. 18, 29. Ic lét míne wylne ðé ego dedi ancillam meam in sinum tuum, Gen. 16, 5. Se arcebiscop lét hit eall heora gene rde the archbishop left it all to their own discretion, Chart. Th. 341, 11. God hðenum leódum lét anwealde God left them to the power of heathen nations, Jud. 1, 8. lét handa Madian tradidit illos in manu Madian, 6, 1. Ðá gyrnde se cyng ealra ðæra þegna ðe ða eorlas r hæfdon, and létan ealle him handa, Chr. 1048; Erl. 180, 9. forsáwon eall mín geþeaht and léton eów giémeléste ðonne ic eów cídde despexistis omne consilium meum et increpationes meas neglexistis, Past, 36, 1; Swt. 247, 22. Swá swá hit his yldran létan and lfdan ðam gewealde as his parents left and bequeathed it to be at his disposal, L. O. 14; Th. i. 184, 3; Lchdm. iii. 286, 15. Hine eft ðm mannum hálne and gesundne ágeaf ðám ðe hine r deádne léton gave him back safe and sound to the men who before had left him dead, Blickl. Homl. 219, 22. Lt ðíne lác beforan ðam altare relinque munus tuum ad altare, Mt. Kmbl. 5, 24. Lt ðú him blód on dre let blood for him from a vein, L. M. 1, 4; Lchdm. ii. 46, 22. Beó ðú be ðínum and lt be mínum be thou with thine, and leave me with mine, Lchdm. iii. 288, 8. Gif tóþ of ásleá lt hig frige dentem si excusserit, dimittet eos liberos, Ex. 21, 27. Lte hig frige, 26. lraþ ðæt man nig ne lte unbiscpod lange, Wulfst. 120, 15. Lte [ðæt feoh] án and se ágend let him give up [the property], and let the owner take it, L. H. E. 7; Th. i. 30, 9: 12; Th. i. 34, 12. Hwilce hwíle hine wille Drihten hér on worlde ltan how long the Lord will leave him in this world, Blickl. Homl. 125, 9. sceal ltan his unnyttan geþancas of his móde he must dismiss his idle thoughts from his mind, Wulfst. 234, 26. Ðonne nyle ltan hiera ágnum wilnungum quos in sua desideria non relaxat, Past. 50, 4; Swt. 391, 22. be ðæm ánum ltan wolde ac ofer ðone gársecg ðone ylecan leóman ðæs fullan geleáfan áspringan lét he would not leave off when that [the spreading of the gospel over part of the world] only was done, but caused the same beam of the perfect faith to spring forth across the ocean [to England], Lchdm. iii. 432, 16. Wið poccum swíðe sceal mon blód ltan, L. M. 1, 40; Lchdm. ii. 106, 3. Nis him blód ltanne, 35; Lchdm. ii. 82, 16. III. to let, cause, make, get, have, cause to be, place :-- Ic hine symble gehýre and míne mildse ofer ðone lte I will ever hear him, and my mercy shall be upon that man, Wulfst. 264, 11. Swá hiora lufe neár Gode ltaþ swá bióþ orsorgru the nearer to God they place their love, the more free are they from care, Bt. 39, 7; Fox 222, 24: 40, 7; Fox 242, 26-28. lét betwux him and mínum feóndum ðæt nfre gesewen [wæs] fram him posuit tenebras latibulum suum, Ps. Th. 17, 11. Ðá fór norþryhte be ðæm lande lét him ealne weg ðæt wéste land on ðæt steórbord then he sailed due north along the coast: he had the waste land all the way on his starboard, Ors. 1, 1; Swt. 17, 10. Ða lét standan beforan ymbeútan ða eardungstówe quos stare fecit circa tabernaculm, Num. 11, 24. sette scole and on ðære lét cnihtas lran he set up a school, and had boys taught in it; instituit scholam in qua pueri literis erudirentur, Bd. 3, 18; S. 545, 45. Se cing lét gerídan ealle ða land ðe his módor áhte him handa, Chr. 1042; Erl. 169, 19: 1023; Erl. 162, 35: 1035; Erl. 164, 22. Wit ðæt ðá létan and unéþelíce þurhtugan ðæt ðæs geþafa wolde beón with difficulty we got him to assent to it, Bd. 5, 4; S. 617, 17. léton hig hádian bisceopum they got themselves ordained bishops, 1053; Erl. 188, 14. IV. to make a thing appear [so and so], make as if, make out, profess, pretend, estimate, consider, suppose, think :-- Ic léto existimabo, Lk. Skt. Lind. 13, 18. léttes arbitretur, Jn. Skt. Lind. 16, 2. Ne ltaþ non dissimulamus, Wrt. Voc. ii. 62, 22. Ealle ltaþ efendýrne Engliscne and Deniscne we estimate all at the same amount, Englishman and Dane, L. A. G. 2; Th. i. 152, 12. [Cf. Icel. manngjöld skyldi jöfn látin ok spora-höggit.] Ðonne ðisses middangeardes welan foresettaþ and ús leófran ltaþ ðonne ða lufan ðara heofonlícra eádignessa cum mundi divitias amori cælestium præponimus, Bd. 3, 19; S. 548, 16. Fela is ðæra ðe embe bletsunga oððe unbletsunga leóhtlíce ltaþ many are there that esteem lightly of blessings or cursings [cf. Piers P. iv. 160-161 moste peple ... leten mekenesse a maistre and Mede a mansed schrewe. Loue lete of hir lite and lewte it lasse: Orm. 7523- uss birrþ lætenn unnorneli and litell off uss sellfenn and lætenn wel off oþre menn], L. I. P. 6; Th. ii. 310, 36. beótlíce lætaþ ye boast, Wulfst. 46, 15. þencaþ and ltaþ ðæt warscype, ðæt óðre mágan pcan, 55, 2. lét ðæt hyt Dryhtnes sylfes andwlyta wre he supposed that it was the face of the Lord himself, St. Andr. 42, 9. Ðá sendun hig mid searwum ða ðe rihtwíse léton observantes miserunt insidiatores qui se justos simularent, Lk. Skt. 20, 20. Ðá léton sume ðæt ðæt mycel unrd wre some of them considered it a very bad plan, Chr. 1052; Erl. 179, 32. Manige léton ðæt hit cometa wre many supposed that it was a comet, 1097; Er1.234, 13. Ðæs ðe men léton as men supposed, Erl. 234, 17. selfe léton gðer ge for heáne ge for unwrste they considered themselves as abject and undone; ultima propemodum desperatione tabuerunt [cf. Piers P. xv. 5 somme leten me for a lorel], Ors. 3, 1; Swt. 98, 22. Léton ðá gedwealde men, swylce Simon Godes sylfes sunu wre. Wulfst. 99, 7. Ðæt man þurh ðæt lte ðæt ðæs legeres wyrðe so that for that reason it be considered that he is worthy of such burial, L. Edg. C. 29; Th. ii. 250, 17. Ðæt ða ðe him underþiédde síen lte him gelíce æqualem se subditis deputet, Past. 17, 1; Swt. 107, 15. Ðæt cild ðe læg on cradele ða gýtseras lton efenscyldig and hit gewittig wre, L. C. S. 77; Th. i. 420, 2. Ic wælle léta æstimabo, Lk. Skt. Lind. 13, 20. Se ealdormonn sceal ltan hine selfne gelícne his hiéremonnum, Past. 17, 1; Swt. 107, 8. V. to behave towards, treat :-- Ðam elþeódigan and útancumenan ne lt ðú uncúþlíce wið hine as regards the alien and foreigner do not behave unkindly towards him [cf. Icel. björn lætr allblítt við hana], L. Alf. 47; Th. i. 54, 20. VI. to let [land, &c.] :-- Eádward cyning and ða híwan in Wintanceastre ltaþ Dænewulfe bisceope twentig hída landes, Chart. Th. 158, 7. Ðá com sum óðer and beád máre ðonne ðe óðer r sealde and se cyng hit létt ðam menn ðe him máre beád then some other man came and offered more than the other had before given, and the king let it to the man that offered more, Chr. 1086; Erl. 220, 10. Ðá létan him ðæt land æt Eádburge byrig, Cod. Dip. Kmbl. iv. 76, 5: Chart. Th. 151, 6. VII. with adverbs :-- Ðás óðre ltaþ ðone n áweg on sopinum these others let the n fall away in the supine, Ælfc. Gr. 28; Som. 31, 60. Ælmr abbod ltan áweg they let abbot Aylmer go away, Chr. 1011; Erl. 145, 13. Ðá cwdon ða witan ðæt betere wre ðæt man ðene áþ áweg léte ðonne hine man sealde ... Ðá lét ðone áþ áweg then the witan said that it would be better that the oath should be dispensed with than that it should be taken ... Then he omitted the oath, Chart. Th. 289, 24-30. Æt ealre ðære hergunge and æt eallum ðám hearmum ðe r ðam gedón wre r ðæt friþ geset wre man eall onweig lte and nán man ðæt ne wræce ne bóte ne bidde as regards all the harrying and all the injuries that were done before the peace was made, let it all be dismissed, and let no man avenge it or ask for compensation, L. Eth. ii. 6; Th. i. 288, 3. Petrus cnucode óþ ðæt hine inn léton Peter knocked until they let him in, Homl. Th. i. 382, 23. lt him eáþelíce ymbe ðæt he takes it easily, Wulfst. 298, 30: Homl. Skt. 4, 342. [Goth. létan: O. Sax. látan: O. Fries. léta: Icel. láta: O. H. Ger. lázan.] DER. á-, for-, ge-, of-, on-, tó- ltan.


Source: Bosworth/Toller, page b0636, entry 6
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líc, es; n. A body [living or dead] generally the latter; the word remains in lich-gate, lyke-wake :-- Líc oððe líchama corpus, Ælfc. Gr. 9, 32; Som. 12, 16. Líc gðer ge cuces ge deáðes corpus; líc oððe hreáw funus; líc oððe hold cadaver, Wrt. Voc. 85, 51-54: 49, 25. Næs nán hús on eallum Egipta lande ðe líc inne ne lge neque erat domus, in qua non jaceret mortuus, Ex. 12, 30. Ealle ða hwíle ðe ðæt líc biþ inne, ðr sceal beón gedrync and plega, Ors. 1, 1; Swt. 20, 25. Ðr ðæs hlendes ne áléd wæs ubi positum fuerat corpus iesu, Jn. Skt. 20, 12. Cwæþ ðæt his líc wre leóht and scéne, Cd. 14; Th. 17, 25; Gen. 265. Ðendan bu somod líc and sáwle lifgan móte whilst both soul and body may live together, Exon. 27 a; Th. 81, 21; Cri. 1327. Líc and gst, 46 b; Th. 160, 8; Gú. 940: 50 a; Th. 172, 25; Gú. 1149. Næs úre gemled ne líc ne leoþu neither body nor limbs were marked by the fire, 74 a; Th. 278, 3; Jul. 592. Líc sáre gebrocen, bánhús blódfág, Andr. Kmbl. 2808; An. 1406. Ðé is gedál witod líces and sáwle, Cd. 43; Th. 57, 20; Gen. 931. Sweostor mín líces mge my sister, kinswoman according to the flesh, 89; Th. 110, 4; Gen. 1833. Líces lustas lusts of the flesh, Exon. 71 b; Th. 267, 2; Jul. 409: 26 b; Th. 79, 28; Cri. 1297. Gang ciricean ðæs hálgan Óswaldes líce and site ðr ingredere ecclesiam, et accedens ad sepulcrum Osualdi, ibi reside, Bd. 3, 12; S. 537, 9. Stód se biscop æt ðam líce, 4, 11; S. 580, 13: L. Edg. c. 65; Th. ii. 258, 13. Bæþ wið ðam miclan líce a bath for elephantiasis, L. M. 1, 32; Lchdm. ii. 78, 18. Mynte ðæt gedlde ánra gehwylces líf wið líce meant to part the life of each one from the body, Beo. Th. 1470; B. 733. ðæt andweorc of Adames líce áleoþode, Cd. 9; Th. 11, 18; Gen. 177. sceáf reáf of líce, 76; Th. 94, 21; Gen. 1565. Forþ gewát Cham of líce Ham died, 79; Th. 97, 35; Gen. 1623. his líc námon and hine on byrgene lédon, Mk. Skt. 6, 29: Beo. Th. 4261; B. 2127: L. Eth. v. 12; Th. i. 308, 5: vi. 21; Th. i. 320, 6. Ðæs mynstres bróðra dydon sce. Cúþberhtes líc of eorþan, and ðæt gemétton swá gesund swá ðágyt lifde, Shrn. 82, 14. Se ús líf forgeaf, leomu, líc and gst, Exon. 19 a; Th. 48, 25; Cri. 777. His [the Phœnix] líc, 59 b; Th. 216, 14; Ph. 268. wearp hine ðá on wyrmes líc, Cd. 25; Th. 31, 26; Gen. 491. Eowre líc sceolon sweltan on ðisum wéstene vestra cadavera jacebunt in solitudine, Num. 14, 32. Ðr ðara arcebisceopa líc bebyrigde syndon ubi archiepiscopi Cantiæ sepeliri solent, Bd. 4, 1; S. 565, 5. Forleósan líca gehwilc ðara ðe lífes gást fæðmum þeahte, Cd. 64; Th. 77, 26; Gen. 1281. Lícu cadavera, Hymn. Surt. 52, 27. [Goth. leik: O. Sax. O. Frs. lík: Icel. lík: Dan. lig: Swed. lik: O. H. Ger. líh: Ger. leiche.] DER. eofor-, wyrm-líc.


Source: Bosworth/Toller, page b0655, entry 9
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mge, an; f. A kinswoman:-- Elizabeth ðín mge (MSS. A. B. mage. ) Elisabeth cognata tua. Lk. Skt. 1. 36. Hér sit Leófld mín mge, Ðurcilles wíf, Chart. Th. 337, 30. Cwæð ðæt heó wre gramena mge, Deáðes dóhtor, Homl. Skt. 2. 173. Saga ðæt ðú síe sweostor mín, líces mge, Cd. 89; Th. 110, 4; 6611. 1833: 127; Th. 162, 18; Gen. 2683. In Dauides dýrre mgan (the Virgin Mary), Exon. 9a; Th. 7, 5; Cri. 96. v. máge, mg.



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